Melbourne Specialist International School Art Exhibition and Fundraiser

A Friday to remember: If you are a big fan of art and socialising. Plus you like to help out raising funds for something worthwhile, then the event for you is just around the corner.

On Friday 23rd September 2016 between 6pm and 9pm Melbourne Specialist International School are holding their annual art exhibition at ReDot Fine Art Gallery, Old Hill Street Police Station. Everybody is welcome to attend.

Melbourne Specialist International School (MSIS) partners with a truly unique school in Melbourne, Australia called Port Phillip Specialist School to collaboratively meet the needs of their students with special needs. Situated in the Loewen Cluster in the Dempsey area of Singapore, MSIS offers a unique and innovative model for teaching students with intellectual and multiple disabilities.

The evening will include an auction of artwork from artists within Singapore who have kindly donated their artwork, there are some fantastic raffle prizes up for grabs and guests will be entertained by dancing and piano performance by students. Not only that but there will be some delicious food and drink at this wonderful event.

Each year the MSIS school community comes together to showcase the student’s excellent artwork to raise funds for the school. The funds raised by the Parent Association will be used to improve the common areas at the school to support the children with various disabilities.

Giorgio Pillar from ReDot Fine Art Gallery is an advocate for Melbourne Specialist International School and kindly offered to host the first Art Exhibition at his private gallery. Giorgio is the founder of ReDot Fine Art Gallery which he opened in 2004. This gallery specializes in displaying a wide range of Aboriginal art.

The students have also created soft sculptures that are part of this exhibition which will also be sold during this event.

With regards to the artistic origins of these masterpieces, Giorgio and his team at ReDot Fine Art Gallery have educated the children on the background to the sculptures they have made.

Australian Aboriginal artists have used an art practice initiative that uses recycled woollen blankets dyed in the art centres with local plants, and even rusted metal found in and around the outback to make soft sculptures. The sculptures range from small standing figures or spirits, insects and reptiles, to slightly larger animals such as camels and birds. Embellished with brightly coloured hand embroidery and sometimes feathers or beads, they exude a unique quirkiness which is their trademark feature.

Using the artistic influences they learned about, the students started to work on their own individual project for this exhibition. Each sculpture represents the child’s personal horoscope zodiac, which they personally assembled. Their tenacity and skill are clearly visible in each finished sculpture.

View the invitation